Down the Rabbit Hole…

9/20/15

"Found" ©Gina DeGideo

“Found” ©Gina DeGideo

Years ago, I made this photograph on a family day trip up to small rural town in northern Arizona for my nephew’s fourth birthday party. My son, along with a couple of his cousins and I, ventured down a pathway leading from the party for a quick walk. I carried my small point and shoot digital camera to take some snaps of the boys by the creek. I had remembered that down this path was also an amazing tree house my cousins and I had grown up climbing and playing in.

Just minutes into our hike on the trail, often used as a roadway for everyone in town to ride quads, jeeps, and dirt bikes, I stumbled upon this completely flattened and decomposing rabbit in the sand. The animal’s fascinating form, preservation, cleanliness, fluffiness, and unfortunate situation demanded my full attention. I responded to my found object by photographing it (how could I not) including my foot. Its perfect face and form make this one of my favorite photographs to date.

The American Southwest at 75mph

7/25/14
I finally was afforded the one-way opportunity to be a passenger, instead of a driver, on our most recent road trip from Arizona to California. I am a natural observer of the land and I love to look! It has always interested me how while passing through the world at such a high rate of speed your eye creates a visual pattern of objects in your view. You know this to be true if you’ve ever driven by a cornfield in a car. When passing through the desert, my gaze is always focused on the far-away mountains and the curious things I can see in the distance. On the trip I found myself photographing with my cell phone. What was revealed were the patterns, shapes, colors, and alien objects that exist in the middle of nowhere. Looking at all of the images together worked even better to affirm the idea of a deconstructed view and an abstracted landscape.

SW LAndscape at 75mph WEB

 

F/455 and Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day

5/5/14
Last week on April 27th photo nerds celebrated Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day by going out with their pinhole cameras and photographing. My weapon of choice: my home-made wooden 4×5 box pinhole camera with an aperture or f/455, designed by James Hajicek and built in one of his workshops. My ammo: some expired and out-of-production Fugi positive color film given to me by a friend to play with. I was a little nervous about getting a good exposure as color positive film is so finicky when it comes to exposure and with most pinhole cameras, “You just accept what the universe gives you,” says James Hajicek. But, behold, I did get a worthwhile exposure and an image!

by Gina DeGideo

There is something awesome about creating an image with such simple tools (a light tight box and a tiny hole), that makes you realize photography is pretty rad.

Collecting Event of the Year – Annual Silent Auction

11/12/13

Narcissus Tresamble, Benabbio, Italy by Gina DeGideo

Narcissus Tresamble, Benabbio, Italy
by Gina DeGideo

Join me and Art Intersection for the collecting event of the year at our 2013 Silent Auction on December 7th, 5-8 pm. This event is held as the annual fundraiser to help keep the doors open and the lights on, aside from helping to bring in world-renowned artist and provide emerging artists with a place to show each year.

The Annual Silent Auction event at Art Intersection is a fantastic opportunity for new collectors to start their collection. With low prices on many highly collectable pieces, you’re sure to find something to fall in love with. This year I’ve donated a limited edition toned gelatin silver 4×5 contact print from a pinhole camera. This is a new print from a series of 4×5 pinhole images I am beginning to shoot and print.

Some of the many notable artists donating:

David Emitt Adams

Kate Breakey

Wynn Bullock

Imogen Cunningham

Binh Danh

Allen Dutton

James Hajicek

Mark Klett

Carol Panaro-Smith

Robin V. Robinson

View the online gallery

Daily Photography – Leaving the Hospital

10/8/12
The concept of daily photography is one that I think can be helpful to some. Although it is fabulous to get those creative juices flowing, I think I must side with my former professor Chris Colville in that it results in a lot of really crappy photographs that I get tired of looking at. While the exercise is valuable, I don’t know that posting all is valuable to the viewer. What do you guys think?

Instead of committing to a daily photograph, I use my cell phone camera to capture anything I see as interesting. I keep these as visual notes and I feel they do improve my more artistic shooting. However, I am a fan of editing – not of digital manipulation that is, but of editing out terrible shots. From now on I will post some of my mobile pics as I see fit and hopefully you all will feel inspired… or at least think they are of interest 🙂 .
* * * UPDATE: You can now find my mobile shots on my Instagram * * *

Leaving the Hospital

Chillin in the Batcave

8/26/12

ImageBlack sheets + Construction Paper Bats + Batman Masks + Flashlights = Fun for 5 year-olds

Little man just turned 5 (oh dear God I feel old,) and because he wanted a Batman themed birthday party we did it up, fort style. Me and hubby transformed the livingroom (luckily already pained gray) into a batcave for his sleep over and these lil monsters had a blast! These are some of the awesome pics I took of them wildn’ out last night 🙂 .

ImageImageImageTracking movements with light and time

ImageImage

Muscle Men on Exhibit

7/27/12

Although this side of me is so vastly different from some of my other styles of working, I find collaging to be an interesting method of making work. I see a similarity between styles of collaging and photography. As the artist, you have to deal with what is present, what is tangible; this takes a certain eye to make connections. Collaging, like shooting through a lens and printing, allows for manipulation of the found objects after the fact.

There I sat bored, flipping through the pages of the school newspaper on campus, looking for inspiration. I was mostly interested in the ridiculous cover story featuring a student who draws similarities between himself and Batman. He was posed flexing his muscles in his dark knight get up. I moved along through the paper and found a feature of a student athlete who just placed in some event, also showing off his guns.

I cut the photographs from the newsprint and cyanotyped them. Naturally, I felt the blue of the chemistry would resonate with their boy-ness. I loved the interaction between the two figures, the oddball and the jock, both in their silly poses. I wanted many more, so I set out in search of found pictures.

In the end I’ve created many of these limited edition prints, which are now on stone tiles. Eventually I would like to get the collection to at least 100. The emphasis on this repeating movement and the connection to gender identities are overwhelming when the little men are all together in a large group. My Muscle Men will be on display for the first time in installation form at Art Intersection in Gilbert from August 4-25, 2012. Join me at the opening reception Saturday August 4, from 7-9 pm.

One Man, One Tutu, One Goal

5/24/12

I had the privilege of meeting the world renowned tutu man, Bob Carey and his wonderful wife Linda a couple of weeks ago. I learned about their ambitious goal of publishing a book to promote happiness. Linda is a breast cancer warrior and Bob is a long-time photographer. He began a project focused on an alter-ego of a happy-go-lucky hairy man in a tutu (my own interpretation) while examining issues of body consciousness. His photographs appeal to everyone’s inner-child and you cannot help but to feel joy when viewing them. Aside from their comical oddity, the images feature gorgeous landscapes and wonderful decisive moment shots. The pictures become even more astounding when you realize the vast shots and impeccable timing are controlled by Bob Carey himself via cable release, and are self-portraits.

As Bob tells it, the idea for the project began when Linda shared the amusing photographs with other women as they waited for chemo treatments. It brought a smile to the women’s faces. This prompted Bob to create a book Ballerina filled with the images, which could be in every hospital and cancer treatment center in the country… or even the world!

What was born from this is The Tutu Project! Bob and Linda are raising money to publish the book by selling pre-orders of the books with a print inside, t-shirts, separate prints, and by taking donations. After the book is published on September 1, 2012, the proceeds from the book sales will be put in a foundation that the couple is starting for financial assistance for things like medication and transportation for breast cancer fighters. Help me in supporting this cause, visit TheTutuProject.com for more info.

Gold in the Desert

1/6/12
Update on Leave Nothing, Take Only Gold Hearts

My environmental-ish Gold Hearts project was launched a couple of months ago and although I did not get as much of a response as I had anticipated, it was a great experience and helped me to understand the nature of my target audience now. I learned that the expectation of the viewer is instant gratification; that I must relay the message in seconds, not minutes. Also, I may have underestimated the nature of hikers in the desert to NOT take something found. The old saying does say take ONLY PICTURES, leave nothing behind.

I am thankful to those who did participate. Thanks for making my day and look out for other artistic ambushes in the future!