F/455 and Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day

5/5/14
Last week on April 27th photo nerds celebrated Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day by going out with their pinhole cameras and photographing. My weapon of choice: my home-made wooden 4×5 box pinhole camera with an aperture or f/455, designed by James Hajicek and built in one of his workshops. My ammo: some expired and out-of-production Fugi positive color film given to me by a friend to play with. I was a little nervous about getting a good exposure as color positive film is so finicky when it comes to exposure and with most pinhole cameras, “You just accept what the universe gives you,” says James Hajicek. But, behold, I did get a worthwhile exposure and an image!

by Gina DeGideo

There is something awesome about creating an image with such simple tools (a light tight box and a tiny hole), that makes you realize photography is pretty rad.

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A History of Fresh Food in the Desert

2/1/14

Kenneth and Cattle by Gina DeGideo, with photograph by Marvin Morrison

Kenneth and Cattle by Gina DeGideo, with photograph by Marvin Morrison

I am happy to be showing a portion of my work from the series Revisiting the Photographs of Marvin Morrison at Modified Arts in Phoenix, AZ. The exhibition, curated by Kimber Lanning, focuses on the history and evolution of growing food in the desolate landscape we live in. The exhibition, open now through February 15th, 2014, also features work from Heather Gill and from the extensive collection of Jeremy Rowe. Join us for the closing reception on Friday, February 7th during First Fridays!

Collecting Event of the Year – Annual Silent Auction

11/12/13

Narcissus Tresamble, Benabbio, Italy by Gina DeGideo

Narcissus Tresamble, Benabbio, Italy
by Gina DeGideo

Join me and Art Intersection for the collecting event of the year at our 2013 Silent Auction on December 7th, 5-8 pm. This event is held as the annual fundraiser to help keep the doors open and the lights on, aside from helping to bring in world-renowned artist and provide emerging artists with a place to show each year.

The Annual Silent Auction event at Art Intersection is a fantastic opportunity for new collectors to start their collection. With low prices on many highly collectable pieces, you’re sure to find something to fall in love with. This year I’ve donated a limited edition toned gelatin silver 4×5 contact print from a pinhole camera. This is a new print from a series of 4×5 pinhole images I am beginning to shoot and print.

Some of the many notable artists donating:

David Emitt Adams

Kate Breakey

Wynn Bullock

Imogen Cunningham

Binh Danh

Allen Dutton

James Hajicek

Mark Klett

Carol Panaro-Smith

Robin V. Robinson

View the online gallery

Revisiting the Photographs of Marvin Morrison

8/19/13

Cotton Stomper, photograph by Marvin Morrison

Cotton Stomper, photograph by Marvin Morrison

My first solo exhibition and biggest show thus far opened last week at Art Intersection. One year in the making, the show featured 17 prints on the walls from scanned slides, negatives, and prints, with creative writing text below them. A hard cover handmade artist book, and a commemorative platinum/palladium print also sit together in a clamshell box set, on display.

DSC_4506

DSC_4535

The photographs are from a local farmer named Marvin Morrison, who passed away in 2007. His son, Howard, came to Art Intersection and to me looking to commission a project and exhibition based on the remaining photos from his father. In an ironic turn of events I found out that in my previous project Arid Zone Utopia I had actually been photographing in some of the exact places Marvin had been, only 60 years later.

When Howard brought the images to me I was struck at the unique stories I felt the images told. For a lifelong farmer who surely would’ve never considered himself a photographer or artist, there were some amazing images! They had a quiet and telling beauty to them. I felt a connection to the intimacy of many of them and decided this could definitely become something great.

I spent the next year gathering stories and memories from Marvin’s sons and wife, June, while learning all of the players in the family dynamic and getting to know the people individually. In doing so I also got to know Marvin, the man I would never meet. In these verbal descriptions of him, being in his lifelong home, and in the revelations of his photographs, I understood who he was.

...It's 5 am on a chilly Fall morning and the dew is just beginning to settle. Father and son plow ahead bailing 100lb packages of cut alfalfa, their machine shooting them out in perfect blocks. The two have been at it since the early morning hours. The son does his work and remains quiet; his shouting wouldn't be heard over the grumbling John Deere engine anyway. He knows his labor will be rewarded by his comrades in the barn later that day. He will rule as king of the Lego brick fort that the gang constructs when he returns with the goods, and it will be glorious...

…It’s 5 am on a chilly Fall morning and the dew is just beginning to settle. Father and son plow ahead bailing 100lb packages of cut alfalfa, their machine shooting them out in perfect blocks. The two have been at it since the early morning hours. The son does his work and remains quiet; his shouting wouldn’t be heard over the grumbling John Deere engine anyway. He knows his labor will be rewarded by his comrades in the barn later that day. He will rule as king of the Lego brick fort that the gang constructs when he returns with the goods, and it will be glorious…

To compliment the edited down images, I created captions based on family memories, and while sometimes channeling Marvin himself and putting myself in his shoes, based on what I’ve learned of him. The lines of text sit just slightly underneath the image and run as an accent to the pale-colored vintage feel of the prints made from his photographs.

The book is perhaps my favorite part of the project. For the past few years I’ve loved book-making and tried to use it in my work when it makes sense to. When looking at Marvin’s photos, I saw a distinct difference between more general farm-life pictures and between family-oriented photos. One of my favorite images is one of all of the women in the family wearing matching nightgowns, obviously homemade gifts from Grandma, and posing together for a picture on Christmas Eve.

Morrison Book-by Gina DeGideo

I knew I had to use these wonderful pictures in some way, which lead me to the reworked family photo album book. I wanted the book to be fun and also to be something that could be displayed in the gallery in a 3-dimensional way, so I chose the accordion style construction. I unified the many different image styles from different eras, from black and white to color, and printed them all digitally with a uniform sepia tonality. I’ve been dying to make an accordion book with handwritten photo captions (like you would see if you turned over an old photograph; yeah, when people still printed them!) on the back for some time now, and felt this was definitely the project to incorporate this into. June was the natural choice to illustrate the captions. Her fabulous cursive scribbles were done in pencil, scanned in, and digitally printed on the backs of the images. I love how this book has become a sort of unknowing collaboration between Marvin’s photos and his wife’s captions.

Morrison Opening 1

In the end, I am extremely happy with the artwork and so glad I had this unique opportunity to create something wonderful from someone else’s found photographs. I can now continue on with more of my personal projects, but I am so thankful for the experience and I’d like to think that Marvin likes it too 😉 .

Morrison Opening 2

Morrison Opening 3

Toscana Travel Photies

7/23/13
Traveling to Italy was an amazing lifelong dream that finally came true for me last month. I couldn’t have picked a better a better group to go with. My lovely mentors and friends Carol and James put together an out of this world program to inspire others to live creatively. For 10 days in the gorgeous Tuscan hills we woke up to church bells ringing from our ancient castle-like home, enjoyed a morning of yoga, fresh-baked bread and espresso, then filled our days with writing, art-making, amazing food-eating, and of course a bit of vino and laughs. This trip allowed me to connect in a deeper way with many others on the journey with me, but most of all truly served the purpose of getting me back into living creatively. My batteries are charged and I have been on overdrive since returning home, but functioning on high speed now certainly wouldn’t have been possible without sweet Italy.
These are some of my favorite photos from the trip…

Benabbio Walking to Dinner

 

Benabbio Flowers

 

Book 1

 

Clouds from Workshop 2

 

Cyanotype 2

 

Wall at the Mill

 

Looking Through Lucca

 

Gato Ferocio

 

Blue Trees of Benabbio

Mill Window

 

Backyard Bennabbio

My Shadoe in Benabbio

 

Boots at Mill

Trees at Mill

 

Parlor Villa San Rocco

GiGi in the Mirror

 

Old Mill

Yoga Studio 4

   Super Moon in Benabbio

 

Glass Floor San Rocco

 

Bricked in Window

Path

…other artwork from the journey coming soon…